Articles | Volume 39, issue 5
Ann. Geophys., 39, 849–859, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-39-849-2021

Special issue: Special Issue on the joint 19th International EISCAT Symposium...

Ann. Geophys., 39, 849–859, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-39-849-2021

Regular paper 24 Sep 2021

Regular paper | 24 Sep 2021

Observations of sunlit N2+ aurora at high altitudes during the RENU2 flight

Pål Gunnar Ellingsen et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (11 Feb 2021) by Daniel Whiter
AR by Pål G. Ellingsen on behalf of the Authors (23 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Feb 2021) by Daniel Whiter
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (07 May 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (07 Jun 2021) by Daniel Whiter
AR by Pål G. Ellingsen on behalf of the Authors (25 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Aug 2021) by Daniel Whiter
AR by Pål G. Ellingsen on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Aug 2021) by Daniel Whiter
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Short summary
Using the RENU2 rocket and ground-based instruments, we show that significant parts of the blue aurora above Svalbard at the time of launch were sunlit aurora. A sunlit aurora occurs when nitrogen molecules are ionised by extreme UV sunlight and subsequently hit by electrons from the Sun, resulting in blue and violet emissions. Understanding the source of an auroral emission gives insight into the interaction between the Sun and the Earth's upper atmosphere.