Articles | Volume 38, issue 6
Ann. Geophys., 38, 1247–1256, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-1247-2020

Special issue: 7th Brazilian meeting on space geophysics and aeronomy

Ann. Geophys., 38, 1247–1256, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-1247-2020

Regular paper 17 Dec 2020

Regular paper | 17 Dec 2020

Diurnal mesospheric tidal winds observed simultaneously by meteor radars in Costa Rica (10° N, 86° W) and Brazil (7° S, 37° W)

Ricardo A. Buriti et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (03 Apr 2020) by Andrew J. Kavanagh
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Jun 2020) by Andrew J. Kavanagh
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Jun 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (30 Jun 2020)
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (14 Jun 2020)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Jul 2020) by Andrew J. Kavanagh
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (07 Sep 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (09 Sep 2020) by Andrew J. Kavanagh
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Sep 2020)
ED: Publish as is (14 Sep 2020) by Andrew J. Kavanagh
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Short summary
Solar atmospheric tides are natural oscillations of 24, 12, 8... hours that contribute to the circulation of the atmosphere from low to high altitudes. The Sun heats the atmosphere periodically because, mainly, water vapor and ozone absorb solar radiation between the ground and 50 km height during the day. Tides propagate upward and they can be observed in, for example, the wind field. This work presents diurnal tides observed by meteor radars which measure wind between 80 and 100 km height.