Articles | Volume 38, issue 6
Ann. Geophys., 38, 1139–1147, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-1139-2020
Ann. Geophys., 38, 1139–1147, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-1139-2020

Regular paper 02 Nov 2020

Regular paper | 02 Nov 2020

An early mid-latitude aurora observed by Rozier (Béziers, 1780)

Chiara Bertolin et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (17 May 2020) by Margit Haberreiter
AR by Chiara Bertolin on behalf of the Authors (22 Jun 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Jun 2020) by Margit Haberreiter
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (04 Jul 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (26 Jul 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 Jul 2020) by Margit Haberreiter
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (19 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (20 Sep 2020) by Margit Haberreiter
AR by Chiara Bertolin on behalf of the Authors (25 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Low-latitude aurorae (LLA) were an uncommon phenomenon not well known or understood in 1780. During our historical manuscript research of high atmospheric phenomena, we came across a document reporting an observation made by the abbot Rozier in Beausejour, France, on 15/08/1780. Thanks to the accuracy of his report, we were able to confirm it was a white, two-band structure LLA. Due to the few existing geomagnetic and solar observations, this is useful new geomagnetic activity proxy data.