Articles | Volume 38, issue 6
Ann. Geophys., 38, 1139–1147, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-1139-2020
Ann. Geophys., 38, 1139–1147, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-1139-2020
Regular paper
02 Nov 2020
Regular paper | 02 Nov 2020

An early mid-latitude aurora observed by Rozier (Béziers, 1780)

Chiara Bertolin et al.

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Latest update: 06 Jul 2022
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Short summary
Low-latitude aurorae (LLA) were an uncommon phenomenon not well known or understood in 1780. During our historical manuscript research of high atmospheric phenomena, we came across a document reporting an observation made by the abbot Rozier in Beausejour, France, on 15/08/1780. Thanks to the accuracy of his report, we were able to confirm it was a white, two-band structure LLA. Due to the few existing geomagnetic and solar observations, this is useful new geomagnetic activity proxy data.