Articles | Volume 36, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-36-695-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-36-695-2018
Regular paper
 | 
03 May 2018
Regular paper |  | 03 May 2018

Plasma flow patterns in and around magnetosheath jets

Ferdinand Plaschke and Heli Hietala

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Fast jets of solar wind particles drive through a slower environment in the magnetosheath, located sunward of the region dominated by the Earth’s magnetic field. THEMIS multi-spacecraft observations show that jets push ambient particles out of their way. These particles flow around the faster jets into the jets’ wake. Thereby, jets stir the magnetosheath, changing the properties of this key region whose particles and magnetic fields can directly interact with the Earth’s magnetic field.