Articles | Volume 38, issue 2
Ann. Geophys., 38, 481–490, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-481-2020
Ann. Geophys., 38, 481–490, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-481-2020

Regular paper 08 Apr 2020

Regular paper | 08 Apr 2020

AMPERE polar cap boundaries

Angeline G. Burrell et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Nov 2019) by Keisuke Hosokawa
AR by Angeline Burrell on behalf of the Authors (18 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Nov 2019) by Keisuke Hosokawa
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Nov 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (07 Dec 2019)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (11 Dec 2019) by Keisuke Hosokawa
AR by Angeline Burrell on behalf of the Authors (21 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Jan 2020) by Keisuke Hosokawa
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 Mar 2020)
ED: Publish as is (11 Mar 2020) by Keisuke Hosokawa
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Short summary
The Earth's polar upper atmosphere changes along with the magnetic field, other parts of the atmosphere, and the Sun. When studying these changes, knowing the polar region that the data come from is vital, as different processes dominate the area where the aurora is and poleward of the aurora (the polar cap). The boundary between these areas is hard to find, so this study used a different boundary and figured out how they are related. Future studies can now find their polar region more easily.