Articles | Volume 38, issue 2
Ann. Geophys., 38, 481–490, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-481-2020
Ann. Geophys., 38, 481–490, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-38-481-2020

Regular paper 08 Apr 2020

Regular paper | 08 Apr 2020

AMPERE polar cap boundaries

Angeline G. Burrell et al.

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Latest update: 01 Aug 2021
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Short summary
The Earth's polar upper atmosphere changes along with the magnetic field, other parts of the atmosphere, and the Sun. When studying these changes, knowing the polar region that the data come from is vital, as different processes dominate the area where the aurora is and poleward of the aurora (the polar cap). The boundary between these areas is hard to find, so this study used a different boundary and figured out how they are related. Future studies can now find their polar region more easily.