Articles | Volume 40, issue 6
Ann. Geophys., 40, 641–663, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-40-641-2022
Ann. Geophys., 40, 641–663, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-40-641-2022
Regular paper
09 Nov 2022
Regular paper | 09 Nov 2022

Impulse-driven oscillations of the near-Earth's magnetosphere

Hiroatsu Sato et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-232', Anonymous Referee #1, 16 May 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Hans Pecseli, 17 Jun 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-232', Takashi Kikuchi, 31 May 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Hans Pecseli, 30 Jun 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (13 Jul 2022) by Dalia Buresova
AR by Hans Pecseli on behalf of the Authors (16 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (20 Jul 2022) by Dalia Buresova
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 Aug 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 Sep 2022) by Dalia Buresova
AR by Hans Pecseli on behalf of the Authors (06 Oct 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Oct 2022) by Dalia Buresova
Download
Short summary
An abrupt increase in pressure associated with interplanetary shocks will compress the Earth's magnetic field. This leads to a sudden impulse also observed in low-latitude magnetometer records. These events are followed by heavily damped oscillations of approximately 5 min periods, depending on plasma conditions. The general features are explained by a simple model. Our results are supported by satellite and ground-based observations. The results are also important for space–weather predictions.