Articles | Volume 39, issue 3
Ann. Geophys., 39, 439–454, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-39-439-2021
Ann. Geophys., 39, 439–454, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-39-439-2021

Regular paper 17 May 2021

Regular paper | 17 May 2021

The geomagnetic data of the Clementinum observatory in Prague since 1839

Pavel Hejda et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • AC1: 'Comment on angeo-2021-11', Pavel Hejda, 25 Feb 2021
    • EC1: 'Reply on AC1', Nick Sergis, 25 Feb 2021
  • RC1: 'Comment on angeo-2021-11', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Feb 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC1', Pavel Hejda, 02 Apr 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on angeo-2021-11', Anonymous Referee #2, 25 Mar 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Pavel Hejda, 02 Apr 2021
  • EC2: 'Comment on angeo-2021-11', Nick Sergis, 31 Mar 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Apr 2021) by Nick Sergis
AR by Pavel Hejda on behalf of the Authors (08 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Apr 2021) by Nick Sergis
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Short summary
Prague's Clementinum belongs to a few magnetic observatories that have been operational from the 1840s to the late 19th century. However, up to now these unique data from 1839 to 1871 have been available exclusively in printed yearbooks and only in raw instrumental units. In this paper, the data were analysed, transformed to physical units, and made available to the scientific community. Application of the data to the analysis of the geomagnetic disturbances in September 1839 is also shown.