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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
It is well known that occasional eruptions of very high energy protons from the Sun directly impact the middle atmosphere in the polar regions. This paper shows that much more frequent high-speed streams in the plasma wind from the Sun can also modify the same parts of the atmosphere. Their effects are made "visible" by strong enhancement of radar echoes in polar winter and were found to affect half of the days when observations were made at Troll, Antarctica, in 2012 and 2013.
Articles | Volume 33, issue 6
Ann. Geophys., 33, 609–622, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-33-609-2015
Ann. Geophys., 33, 609–622, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-33-609-2015

Regular paper 01 Jun 2015

Regular paper | 01 Jun 2015

High-speed solar wind streams and polar mesosphere winter echoes at Troll, Antarctica

S. Kirkwood et al.

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Latest update: 16 Jan 2021
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Short summary
It is well known that occasional eruptions of very high energy protons from the Sun directly impact the middle atmosphere in the polar regions. This paper shows that much more frequent high-speed streams in the plasma wind from the Sun can also modify the same parts of the atmosphere. Their effects are made "visible" by strong enhancement of radar echoes in polar winter and were found to affect half of the days when observations were made at Troll, Antarctica, in 2012 and 2013.
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