Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2024-6
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2024-6
17 Jun 2024
 | 17 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ANGEO.

Observations of traveling ionospheric disturbances driven by gravity waves from sources in the upper and lower atmosphere

Paul Prikryl, David R. Themens, Jaroslav Chum, Shibaji Chakraborty, Robert G. Gillies, and James M. Weygand

Abstract. Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are observed by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR), the multipoint and multifrequency continuous Doppler sounders, and the GNSS total electron content (TEC) mapping technique. PFISR measures electron density altitude profiles, from which TIDs are obtained by a filtering method to remove background densities. SuperDARN observes the ionospheric convection at high latitudes and TIDs modulating the ground scatter power. The Doppler sounders at mid latitudes can determine TID propagation velocities and azimuths. The aim of this study is to attribute the observed TIDs to atmospheric gravity waves generated in the lower thermosphere at high latitudes, or gravity waves generated by mid-latitude tropospheric weather systems. The solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling modulates the dayside ionospheric convection and currents that generate gravity waves driving equatorward propagating medium to large scale TIDs. The horizontal equivalent ionospheric currents are estimated from the ground-based magnetometer data using an inversion technique. At high latitudes, TIDs observed in the detrended TEC maps are dominated by equatorward TIDs pointing to auroral sources. At mid to low latitudes, the azimuths of TIDs vary, indicating sources in the troposphere. The cases of eastward to southeastward propagating TIDs that are observed in the detrended TEC maps and by the HF Doppler sounders in Czechia are attributed to gravity waves that were likely generated by geostrophic adjustment processes and shear instability in the intensifying low-pressure systems.

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Paul Prikryl, David R. Themens, Jaroslav Chum, Shibaji Chakraborty, Robert G. Gillies, and James M. Weygand

Status: open (until 20 Aug 2024)

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  • RC1: 'Comment on angeo-2024-6', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Jul 2024 reply
Paul Prikryl, David R. Themens, Jaroslav Chum, Shibaji Chakraborty, Robert G. Gillies, and James M. Weygand
Paul Prikryl, David R. Themens, Jaroslav Chum, Shibaji Chakraborty, Robert G. Gillies, and James M. Weygand

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Short summary
Travelling ionospheric disturbances are plasma density fluctuations usually driven by atmospheric gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere. The aim of this study is to attribute multi-instrument observations of travelling ionospheric disturbances to gravity waves generated in the upper atmosphere at high latitudes or gravity waves generated by tropospheric weather systems at mid latitudes.