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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 28, issue 3
Ann. Geophys., 28, 687–696, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-28-687-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Three eyes on the Sun – multi-spacecraft studies of...

Ann. Geophys., 28, 687–696, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-28-687-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  01 Mar 2010

01 Mar 2010

Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

G. Nisticò1, V. Bothmer2, S. Patsourakos3, and G. Zimbardo1 G. Nisticò et al.
  • 1Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende, Italy
  • 2Institut für Astrophysik, Goettingen University, Friedrich-Hund Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen, Germany
  • 3Dept. Physics-Section Astrogeophysics,University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece

Abstract. Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

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