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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 24, issue 1
Ann. Geophys., 24, 7–21, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-24-7-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Ann. Geophys., 24, 7–21, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-24-7-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  07 Mar 2006

07 Mar 2006

Measurements of spectral snow albedo at Neumayer, Antarctica

S. Wuttke1,*, G. Seckmeyer1, and G. König-Langlo2 S. Wuttke et al.
  • 1Institute for Meteorology and Climatology, University of Hannover, Herrenhäuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover, Germany
  • 2Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bussestr. 24, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany
  • *now at: Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany

Abstract. Spectral albedo in high resolution, from 290 to 1050 nm, has been measured at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70°39' S, 8°15' W) during the austral summer 2003/2004. At 500 nm, the spectral albedo nearly reaches unity, with slightly lower values below and above 500 nm. Above 600 nm, the spectral albedo decreases to values between 0.45 and 0.75 at 1000 nm. For one cloudless case an albedo up to 1.01 at 500 nm could be determined. This can be explained by the larger directional component of the snow reflectivity for direct incidence, combined with a slightly mislevelled sensor and the snow surface not being perfectly horizontal. A possible explanation for an observed decline in albedo is an increase in snow grain size. The theoretically predicted increase in albedo with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA) could not be observed. This is explained by the small range of SZA during albedo measurements, combined with the effect of changing snow conditions outweighing the effect of changing SZA. The measured spectral albedo serves as input for radiative transfer models, describing radiation conditions in Antarctica.

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