Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2021-48
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2021-48

  25 Aug 2021

25 Aug 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal ANGEO.

A case study of a ducted gravity wave event over northern Germany using simultaneous airglow imaging and wind-field observations

Sumanta Sarkhel1, Gunter Stober2,3, Jorge L. Chau2, Steven M. Smith4, Christoph Jacobi5, Subarna Mondal1, Martin G. Mlynczak6, and James M. Russell III7 Sumanta Sarkhel et al.
  • 1Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee – 247667, Uttarakhand, India
  • 2Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Schlossstr. 6, 18225 Kühlungsborn, Germany
  • 3Institute of Applied Physics & Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
  • 4Center for Space Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • 5Institute for Meteorology, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany
  • 6Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 420, Hampton, VA, USA
  • 7Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Hampton University, 23 Tyler Street, Hampton, VA, USA

Abstract. An intriguing and rare gravity wave event was recorded on the night of 25 April 2017 using a multi-wavelength all-sky airglow imager over northern Germany. The airglow imaging observations at multiple altitudes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region reveal that a prominent upward propagating wave structure appeared in O(1S) and O2 airglow images. However, the same wave structure was observed to be very faint in OH airglow images, despite OH being usually one of the brightest airglow emissions. In order to investigate this rare phenomenon, the altitude profile of the vertical wavenumber was derived based on collocated meteor radar wind-field and SABER temperature profiles close to the event location. The results indicate the presence of a thermal duct layer in the altitude range of 85–91 km in the south-west region of Kühlungsborn, Germany. Utilizing these instrumental datasets, we present an evidence to show how a leaky duct layer partially inhibited the wave progression in the OH airglow emission layer. The coincidental appearance of this duct layer caused the wave amplitudes to diminish, resulting to exhibit as the faint wave front in the OH airglow images during the course of the night over northern Germany.

Sumanta Sarkhel et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on angeo-2021-48', Anonymous Referee #1, 07 Oct 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Sumanta Sarkhel, 27 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on angeo-2021-48', Anonymous Referee #2, 11 Oct 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Sumanta Sarkhel, 23 Nov 2021

Sumanta Sarkhel et al.

Sumanta Sarkhel et al.

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Short summary
A rare gravity wave event was observed on the night of 25 April 2017 over northern Germany. An all-sky airglow imager recorded an upward propagating wave at different altitudes in mesosphere with a prominent wave front above 91 km and faintly observed below. Based on wind and satellite borne temperature profiles close to the event location, we have found the presence of a leaky thermal duct layer in 85–91 km. The appearance of this duct layer caused the wave amplitudes to diminish below 91 km.