Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2021-26
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2021-26

  07 May 2021

07 May 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ANGEO.

Space Weather Study through Analysis of Solar Radio Bursts detected by a Single Station CALLSTO Spectrometer

Theogene Ndacyayisenga1, Ange Cynthia Umuhire1, Jean Uwamahoro2, and Christian Monstein3 Theogene Ndacyayisenga et al.
  • 1University of Rwanda, College of Science and Technology, Kigali, Rwanda
  • 2University of Rwanda, College of Education, P.O. BOX 55, Rwamagana – Rwanda
  • 3Istituto Ricerche Solari (IRSOL), Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), CH-6605 Locarno-Monti, Switzerland

Abstract. This article summarizes the results of an analysis of solar radio bursts detected by the e-Compound Astronomical Low cost Low-frequency Instrument for spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory (e-CALLISTO) spectrometer hosted by the University of Rwanda, College of Education. The data analysed were detected during the first year (2014–2015) of the instrument operation. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to check the location of propagating waves associated with type III radio bursts detected without solar flares. Using quick plots provided by the e-CALLISTO website, we found a total of 202 solar radio bursts detected by the CALLISTO station located in Rwanda. Among them, 5 are type IIs, 175 are type IIIs, and 22 type IVs radio bursts. It is found that all analysed type IIs and ∼37 % of type III bursts are associated with impulsive solar flares while Type IV radio bursts are poorly associated with flares. Furthermore, all of the analysed type II bursts are associated with CMEs which is consistent with the previous studies, and ∼44 % of type IIIs show association with CMEs. On the other hand it is observed that the majority of type IV radio bursts are believed to be originated from CME-driven shocks. Findings from this study confirms that solar radio bursts (SRBs) from ground observation and analysis constitute a clue to diagnose the space weather phenomena such as solar flare and CMEs and to some extent, they may serve as the advance warning of the related severe space weather hazards.

Theogene Ndacyayisenga et al.

Status: open (until 23 Jun 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review angeo-2021-26', Anonymous Referee #1, 25 May 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on angeo-2021-26', Anonymous Referee #2, 14 Jun 2021 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on angeo-2021-26', Anonymous Referee #3, 17 Jun 2021 reply

Theogene Ndacyayisenga et al.

Theogene Ndacyayisenga et al.

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Short summary
This manuscript summarises the results obtained by analysing the solar radio bursts detected by a single spectrogram installed at the University of Rwanda through the collaboration and the initiation of the Space weather initiative. We aimed to show that data gaps in African continent can be tracked by the deployment of sheap spectrograms but their regular maintenance matters. In addition, the results show that the observation at a single station is a clue to invent the gaps in space monitoring.