Journal cover Journal topic
Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 1.490
IF1.490
IF 5-year value: 1.445
IF 5-year
1.445
CiteScore value: 2.9
CiteScore
2.9
SNIP value: 0.789
SNIP0.789
IPP value: 1.48
IPP1.48
SJR value: 0.74
SJR0.74
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 88
Scimago H
index
88
h5-index value: 21
h5-index21
Download
Short summary
Ground-based observations show a phase shift in semi-annual variation of excited hydroxyl emissions at mid-latitudes compared to those at low latitudes. This differs from the annual cycle at high latitudes. We found that this shift in the semi-annual cycle is determined mainly by the superposition of annual variations of T and O concentration. The winter peak for emission is determined exclusively by atomic oxygen concentration, whereas the summer peak is the superposition of all impacts.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2020-80
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2020-80

  07 Dec 2020

07 Dec 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal ANGEO.

Semi-Annual Variation of Excited Hydroxyl Emission at Mid-Latitudes

Mykhaylo Grygalashvyly1, Alexander I. Pogoreltsev2, Alexey B. Andreyev3, Sergei P. Smyshlyaev2, and Gerd R. Sonnemann1 Mykhaylo Grygalashvyly et al.
  • 1Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the University Rostock in Kühlungsborn, Schloss-Str.6, D-18225 Ostseebad Kühlungsborn, Germany
  • 2Department of Meteorological Forecasting, Russian State Hydrometeorological University (RSHU), Saint-Petersburg, Russia
  • 3Institute of the Ionosphere, Almaty, Kazakhstan

Abstract. Ground-based observations show a phase shift in semi-annual variation of excited hydroxyl (OH*) emissions at mid-latitudes (43° N) compared to those at low latitudes. This differs from the annual cycle at high latitudes. We examine this behaviour utilising an OH* airglow model which was incorporated into the 3D chemistry-transport model (CTM). Through this modelling, we study the morphology of the excited hydroxyl emission layer at mid-latitudes (30° N–50° N), and we assess the impact of the main drivers of its semi-annual variation: temperature, atomic oxygen, and air density. We found that this shift in the semi-annual cycle is determined mainly by the superposition of annual variations of temperature and atomic oxygen concentration. Hence, the winter peak for emission is determined exclusively by atomic oxygen concentration, whereas the summer peak is the superposition of all impacts, with temperature taking a leading role.

Mykhaylo Grygalashvyly et al.

 
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for authors/topical editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Mykhaylo Grygalashvyly et al.

Mykhaylo Grygalashvyly et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 290 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
251 36 3 290 2 2
  • HTML: 251
  • PDF: 36
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 290
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 07 Dec 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 07 Dec 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 248 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 246 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 25 Jan 2021
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Ground-based observations show a phase shift in semi-annual variation of excited hydroxyl emissions at mid-latitudes compared to those at low latitudes. This differs from the annual cycle at high latitudes. We found that this shift in the semi-annual cycle is determined mainly by the superposition of annual variations of T and O concentration. The winter peak for emission is determined exclusively by atomic oxygen concentration, whereas the summer peak is the superposition of all impacts.
Citation