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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
The study presents an approach to compare infrasound data and simulated microbarom soundscapes in multiple directions. Data recorded during 2014–2019 at the IS37 in Norway were processed and compared to model results in different aspects: directional distribution, signal amplitude, and ability to track atmospheric changes during extreme events. The results reveal good agreement between model and data. The approach has potential for near-real-time atmospheric and microbaroms diagnostics.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2020-78
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2020-78

  08 Dec 2020

08 Dec 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ANGEO.

Microbarom radiation and propagation model assessment using infrasound recordings: a vespagram-based approach

Ekaterina Vorobeva1,2, Marine De Carlo3,4, Alexis Le Pichon3, Patrick Joseph Espy1, and Sven Peter Näsholm2,5 Ekaterina Vorobeva et al.
  • 1Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  • 2NORSAR, Kjeller, Norway
  • 3CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297, Arpajon, France
  • 4Univ. Brest, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, Laboratoire d’Océanographie Physique et Spatiale (LOPS), IUEM, Brest, France
  • 5Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Abstract. This study investigates the use of a vespagram-based approach as a tool for multi-directional comparison between simulated microbarom soundscapes and infrasound data recorded at ground-based array stations. Data recorded at the IS37 station in northern Norway during 2014–2019 have been processed to generate vespagrams (velocity spectral analysis) for five frequency bands between 0.1 and 0.6 Hz. The back-azimuth resolution between vespagrams and a microbarom model is harmonized by smoothing the modelled soundscapes along the back-azimuth axis with a kernel corresponding to the frequency-dependent array resolution. An estimate of similarity between the output of a microbarom radiation and propagation model and infrasound observations is then generated based on the image processing approach of mean-square difference. The analysis revealed that vespagrams can monitor seasonal variations in the microbarom azimuth distribution, amplitude, and frequency, as well as changes during sudden stratospheric warming. The vespagram-based approach is computationally inexpensive, can uncover microbarom source variability, and has potential for near-real-time stratospheric diagnostics and atmospheric model assessment.

Ekaterina Vorobeva et al.

 
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Ekaterina Vorobeva et al.

Ekaterina Vorobeva et al.

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Short summary
The study presents an approach to compare infrasound data and simulated microbarom soundscapes in multiple directions. Data recorded during 2014–2019 at the IS37 in Norway were processed and compared to model results in different aspects: directional distribution, signal amplitude, and ability to track atmospheric changes during extreme events. The results reveal good agreement between model and data. The approach has potential for near-real-time atmospheric and microbaroms diagnostics.
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