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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
Comparisons were made of ground-based ionosonde (a type of radar) observations of the ionosphere and satellite-based observations of auroral far-ultraviolet emissions to determine whether a remote sensing algorithm for determining auroral ionospheric electron densities from far-ultraviolet emissions was biased by the presence of proton precipitation, and it was found that there was no such bias.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2019-110
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2019-110

  19 Aug 2019

19 Aug 2019

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ANGEO and is expected to appear here in due course.

Auroral ionospheric E region parameters obtained from satellite-based far ultraviolet and ground-based ionosonde observations: Effects of proton precipitation

Harold K. Knight Harold K. Knight
  • Computational Physics, Inc., Springfield, VA, 22151, USA

Abstract. Coincident auroral far ultraviolet (FUV) and ground-based ionosonde observations are compared for the purpose of determining whether auroral FUV remote sensing algorithms that assume pure electron precipitation are biased in the presence of proton precipitation. Auroral particle transport and optical emission models, such as the Boltzmann 3-Constituent (B3C) model, predict that maximum E region electron density (NmE) values derived from auroral Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emission assuming electron precipitation will be biased high by up to ~ 20 % for pure proton aurora, while comparisons between LBH radiances and radiances derived from in situ particle flux observations (i.e., Knight et al., 2008, 2012) indicate that the bias associated with proton aurora should be much larger. Surprisingly, in the comparisons with ionosonde observations described here, no bias associated with proton aurora is found in FUV-derived auroral NmE, which means that auroral FUV remote sensing methods for NmE are more accurate in the presence of proton precipitation than was suggested in the aforementioned earlier works. Possible explanations for the discrepancy with the earlier results are discussed.

Harold K. Knight

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Harold K. Knight

Harold K. Knight

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Short summary
Comparisons were made of ground-based ionosonde (a type of radar) observations of the ionosphere and satellite-based observations of auroral far-ultraviolet emissions to determine whether a remote sensing algorithm for determining auroral ionospheric electron densities from far-ultraviolet emissions was biased by the presence of proton precipitation, and it was found that there was no such bias.
Citation